Clearance & post remediation testing

 

What Is Involved In A Post-Remediation Verification Survey?


mold testing, clearance testing
Post-Remediation means "after mold has been removed". A post-remediation verification survey (sometimes called clearance testing) includes a visual inspection and moisture assessment of the construction materials that were part of the remediation work, and air quality testing inside the work area. Both are necessary to properly assess whether or not the mold remediation was successful.

The purpose of Clearance Testing is to determine the success of the mold remediation efforts inside of existing containment areas to document the areas remediated are safe for occupants to safely enter.



Scope of Clearance Testing:

Clearance Testing consists of a visual assessment for mold problems in area(s) of remediation activities and the collection/analysis of sample(s) in these designated area(s). Further, the objective of Clearance Testing is to determine if mold problems still exist in the designated remediation area(s) sampled. As such, the results of Clearance Testing are not a guarantee that mold does or does not exist in the house; the results are indicative only of the presence or absence of mold in the areas sampled at the time the Clearance Testing is performed. In light of no currently established Threshold Limit Values (TLVs) for the majority of substances of biological origins that are associated with building-related exposures, we follow the guidance of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) 19.5.3.1. Clearance is defined as air samples collected indoors being quantitatively equal to or less than the outdoor samples, and qualitatively similar. Clearance Testing will be conducted when mold remediation and cleanup efforts are completed but before containment is removed.


Sampling:

Clearance air sampling consists of sampling all containment areas using the ACGIH air sampling protocol. For each containment area, two (2) indoor air samples will be collected and one (1) outdoor sample collected. The samples will be sent to an ESA approved Lab, which will analyze them for the presence of mold. The Lab will then issue a report detailing the presence and type(s) of mold. Acceptable clearance is reached when air samples collected indoors being quantitatively equal to or less than the outdoor samples, and qualitatively similar.